Behaviour – Let’s be consistant

By Heather Scribbins

Here are some supporting strategies for different learning barriers:

STRATEGY BANK – ADHD (CONCENTRATION AND IMPULSIVITY)

STRATEGY BANK – ASD (SOCIAL AND COMMUNICATION)

STRATEGY BANK – BASIC NUMERACY DIFFICULTIES

STRATEGY BANK – DE-ESCALATION – PEER CONFLICT IN CLASSROOM

STRATEGY BANK – DYSLEXIC TENDENCIES (LITERACY)

STRATEGY BANK – HANDWRITING DIFFICULTIES

STRATEGY BANK – HEARING IMPAIRMENT

STRATEGY BANK – LANGUAGE NEEDS (EAL, SPEECH & LANGUAGE)

STRATEGY BANK – LANGUAGE-NURTURING ACTIVITIES

STRATEGY BANK – MEMORY FOR LEARNING

STRATEGY BANK – SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL (DEFIANCE, SERIOUS DISRUPTION)

STRATEGY BANK – SUPPORTING CONCENTRATION – STARTER ACTIVITIES

STRATEGY BANK – SUPPORTIVE SEATING PLANS

STRATEGY BANK – VISUAL IMPAIRMENT

Fundamentally it’s about clear, respectful communication clear consistent policies, boundaries which are across college and supported by all members of staff. Expectations are explained during their interview and support is provided to the individual students and their learning journey.

Staff establish the lead and provide positive examples of good behaviour and support students adjusting to a new environment.

The cohort of students which are applying to the college each year are from different cultures, religions, societies, backgrounds and mind-sets of what an education environment can offer and provide support in areas of weakness and understanding to each individual’s needs. Many of these individuals will have experienced a transition resilience, leaving a school environment of structured routine, where they are expected to conform to rules and timings with a larger network of support from agencies and school staff.

Transforming from a child to a young adult is the most confusing time of most people’s lives , the chemical change the imbalances of hormones and identity crisis that all young adults go through is just the beginning of a long road to an uncertain and confusing time of their lives, many individuals may not have the support network or guidance that the need at this time and could be battling other deep traumatic experiences , young care leavers , new environments , they have lost their identities which they have had throughout their school life and many will have lost their secure friend groups through choice of course and college, many will have left with the expectation of being labelled with the same title as they had at school , individuals may have had a negative experience at school where they sat in isolation for the last three months with no teaching or support .

I am mindful that every tutor new and existing will want strategies for behaviour management in their classrooms but each year we are seeing new individuals and groups that display very challenging behaviours and dynamics, so to give a generic list of strategies will not enable tutors as it has to be tailored to individual needs.

E Tracker and REMs, hold important Transition and historical educational information that will allow all staff to access previous interventions, strategies and previous outside agencies that may have enabled the individual to progress in their education environment. E Tracker will also allow you to see who supports the student from ALS and if they have exam concession in place or any special arrangements whilst in class.

In many cases less resilient less supported individuals will struggle not only with the transformation but the new environment and the expectation of behaviour which we tell them, we will treat them like adults, yet many have not reached adulthood or can make the decisions of an adult, it could be through lack of support or guidance.

It is highly important that we have all up to date information on students that may have had historical issues in previous educational environments, and we transfer and support the students with similar strategies in our environment, we must insure that they have a fresh start but with consequences for their actions.

ADHD checklist

ASD checklist

Attachment Disorder checklist

Dyslexia checklist

Dyspraxia checklist

MLD checklist

ODD and CD checklist

In our mission statement it states “In Teaching & Learning to inspire everyone to reach their full potential’.”

We’ve created an environment where people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities can meet, learn and grow. Our courses combine professional-standard facilities, industry specialist tutors and outstanding student support.

Giving a direct choice also minimises unnecessary confrontation and increases co-operation, never direct or single out individuals, always use the phrase ‘a number of students are still discussing /talking I need you all to please listen Thanks’.

Consequences are there to help us take responsibilities for our actions and behaviour.    It should be about individuals and recognising that mobile phones, lateness, language and eating and drinking in class, is not accepted within our college.

Avoid asking why they are late this causes an audience and can lead to confrontation, It wastes time and disrupts the learning of others, have a paper late register time in and reason which can be discussed after the lesson, this will lower the disruption and confrontation or their ability to discuss what could be a sensitive matter or issue outside of college.

The use of mobile phones in lesson needs to be addressed by a whole college approach as this has become high level disruption cause of many confrontation and unnecessary arguments that affect peers and the learning environment.

Positive supportive instructions

  • Hands up please
  • Could you all face this way and listen
  • Thank you for your input, keep it appropriate please
  • Can we discuss this after please
  • I can answer your questions at the end
  • Would you like to take five minutes out of class

Negative responses

  • Don’t call /shout out
  • Stop talking , while I’m talking / shut up
  • That’s rude and nothing to do with what I asked
  • Get out and calm down

behaviour simpsons

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